On population’s self-assessment of the state of heath in 2011

16.05.2012

According to the data of the Central Statistical Bureau (CSB) 47.9% of respondents in 2011 characterised their health as “good” or "very good”. In its turn, 35.5% assessed their health only as “fair”. 13.3% of respondents described their health as "bad" and 3.3% - as "very bad". As compared to 2010 significant changes in self-assessment of state of health have not been recorded.

Comparing gender differences, men gave better assessment for their health condition than women.

Answers to the question “How do you perceive your general health status?” in 2011
(in per cent)

The most optimistic self-perceived health was recorded among young people aged 16-24. 86.5% of them perceive their health as ‘’good’’ or ‘’very good’’. In its turn, the lowest estimations of the state of health were recorded among respondents aged 65 and over. 45.6% of them perceive their health as ‘’bad’’ or ‘’very bad’’.

Despite the generally optimistic assessment of the state of health, in 2011 more than one third (34.7%) of the respondents provided a positive answer to the question ‘’Do you suffer from any chronic illness, long-standing sickness or physical limitations?’’ 30.6% of the respondents mentioned that health problems had disturbed or limited their home, work or leisure activities for at least 6 months. 6.3% of them mentioned that these problems were serious (i.e., there are strong limitations), while 24.3% told that there were limitations, but not so strong. From the results of the survey it can be concluded, that limitations caused by the health problems noticeably increase for people aged 65 and over. 70.3% of the respondents aged 65 and over ascertained that during the last 6 months they had not suffered from health problems that have limited their home, work and leisure activities.

Within the framework of the survey respondents were asked a question “Was there any occasion during the last 12 months when you needed a medical examination or treatment (except dentist), but you did not have it?’’ Positive answer to this question (‘’Yes, there was at least one situation’’) was provided by 21.6% of the respondents. As compared to 2008, the share of persons who needed medical examination or treatment (except dentist), but could not afford it, has grown significantly.

Answers to the question “Was there any occasion during the last 12 months when you needed a medical examination or treatment (except dentist), but you did not have it?’’ in 2008 – 2011
(in per cent)

Data of the survey show that most often medical examination or treatment did not have the unemployed (32.5%) and pensioners (27.9%). In its turn, affirmative answer to the same question was received from a noticeably lower share of the employed (18.2%). Altogether 26.8% of the unemployed and 18.3% pensioners in 2011 at least once had to refuse the needed medical treatment of examination (except dentist) because they could not afford it.

22.7% of the surveyed respondents during the last 12 months needed dental examination or treatment, but they did not have it. 20% of the persons who during the last 12 months at least once needed dental examination or treatment, but did not have it, as the reason thereof mentioned the fact that they could not afford it.

In order to obtain information on population’s self-assessment of the state of health, within the framework of the survey Community Survey on Income and Life Conditions (EU-SILC) the CSB in 2011 surveyed 6.6 thousand households and 13.5 thousand persons. Such survey is carried out annually in all European Union Member States.


Prepared by Income and Living Conditions Statistics Section.
Tel 67366727
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