In 2015, housing costs reached EUR 142 monthly

03.03.2016

Data compiled by the Central Statistical Bureau (CSB) show that in 2015 monthly housing costs grew by 4.4 percentage, reaching EUR 142 per household.

In 2014, housing costs accounted for 16.1 per cent of household disposable income, whereas in 2015 this proportion has fell down to 15.2 per cent. It may be related to the fact that household disposable income grew faster (by 9.3 per cent) than housing costs.

Monthly housing costs and share thereof in household disposable income in 2008 –2005

Housing costs

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

  on average per household, EUR

112

117

118

126

127

134

136

142

  on average per household member, EUR

43

50

47

51

52

55

57

59

  as % of household disposable income*

13.7

14.1

15.6

17.9

17.2

17.3

16.1

15.2

Data source: survey "EU Statistics on Income and Living conditions" of 2008 – 2015
*Data on housing costs in the reference period are compared to the data on household disposable income in the previous period.

Housing costs and burden thereof largely depend on the number of household members

In 2015, housing costs per household member on average comprised EUR 59, whereas in a single person households they on average accounted for EUR 103. As the number of household members increases, housing costs per household member decrease (from EUR 66 in two-person households down to EUR 31 in five and more person households). The housing cost burden is directly dependent upon the number of household members as well. For example, in single person households housing costs account for 24.5 per cent of household disposable income, while in four person households – almost twice less (12.6 per cent).

Total monthly housing costs by number of household members, 2015

 

Housing costs on average per household member, EUR

Housing costs as % of household disposable income

1 person households

103

24.5

2 person households

66

15.3

3 person households

59

14.2

4 person households

47

12.6

5 and more person households

31

10.9

Data source: survey "EU Statistics on Income and Living conditions" of 2008 – 2015
*Data on housing costs in the reference period are compared to the data on household disposable income in the previous period.

In 2015, for couples with children housing costs on average comprised EUR 218 monthly, while households consisting of one adult with children spent EUR 159 monthly. Housing costs in single person households were notably lower: in single person aged under 64 households those were EUR 118 monthly and in single person aged over 65 households – EUR 90 monthly. It may be explained by the fact that persons aged over 65 are thriftier, they use less public utilities (water, electricity, etc.) and live in dwellings with lower housing costs, since disposable income of such persons are by EUR 231 lower than the disposable income of persons aged under 64. Moreover, persons aged over 65 most often live in dwellings owned by them or subsidised by local government, whereas housing costs of persons aged under 64 often include rent, mortgage payments etc.

Household average housing costs by household type, composition and dwelling size, 2015

Household type

Monthly housing costs, EUR

Average number of household members

Average size of dwelling, m2

One adult with children

159

2.5

52

Couple without children

136

2.0

72

Couple with children 

218

3.6

67

Couple with one child

214

3.0

61

Couple with two children

221

4.0

70

Couple with three and more children

230

5.3

83

Single person aged 65 and over

90

1.0

51

Single person (aged under 64)

118

1.0

50

Data source: survey "EU Statistics on Income and Living conditions" of 2015

Seniors, single parent families and large families cover housing costs with the greatest difficulty

In 2015, housing costs in 33.9 per cent of households were heavy burden – a drop of 6.1 percentage points, compared to 2014 (40.0 per cent). The share of households admitting that housing costs are somewhat a burden has increased – from 45.5 per cent in 2014 to 47.7 per cent in 2015. Each fifth or 18.4 of the households admits that housing costs are not burden at all (in 2014 – 14.5 per cent).

 

Breakdown of answers to the question "Is total housing cost a financial burden to your household?", 2008 – 2015 (per cent)

Data source: survey "EU Statistics on Income and Living conditions" of 2008–2015

Housing costs for couples with children accounted for 15.2 per cent of the disposable income thereof. Moreover, 25.9 per cent of those households admitted that housing costs are not burden at all. Whereas in households consisting of one adult with children housing costs comprised 24.1 per cent of the disposable income thereof. Just 14.3 per cent of those households admitted that housing costs are not burden at all.

In 2015, 50.4 per cent of single elderly persons (aged 65 and over) indicated that housing costs are a heavy burden. Moreover, they spent 29 per cent of the disposable income thereof to cover housing costs; in percentage it is almost twice the average indicator in the country. Housing costs were a heavy burden also for large share of single-parent families (42.4 per cent) and households consisting of couple with three and more children (35.5 per cent).

 

Housing cost burden in different types of households, 2015 (per cent)

Is total housing cost a financial burden to your household?

Household has been in arrears on utility bills at least once

Data source: survey "EU Statistics on Income and Living conditions" of 2015

 

 

Single seniors are the most conscientious utility bill payers

Regardless single elderly (aged over 65) had the greatest difficulty in covering housing costs, only 9.1 of them had been in arrears on utility bills during the last 12 months. The highest number of persons being in arrears on utility bills was recorded among households consisting of single adult with children (32.8 per cent) and couples with three or more children (28.2 per cent).

Data on housing costs were acquired within the framework of "EU Statistics on Income and Living conditions" survey of 2015. 8 thousand households were surveyed. Data on 2016 will be compiled this year from March till the end of June.

More information on housing conditions is available in CSB website section Monetary poverty and income inequality – Key indicators. The latest data are published in CSB website section Housing Conditions.

Methodological explanations

In EU-SILC survey the housing costs include:

  • rent (only for tenants);
  • real estate tax (only for owners);
  • heating, electricity, water supply and sewerage, waste disposal, other housing payments;
  • costs of current repairs and regular maintenance,
  • dwelling (not property) insurance costs (if any).

Utilities include payments for water, gas, electricity, heat and waste disposal. Expenses covered by household to provide extra comfort (e.g. payments for cable TV, telephone bills, etc.) are not included.

 

Media requests:
Beate Danusēviča, Kristīne Romanovska
Information and Communication Section
E-mail: media [at] csb [dot] gov [dot] lv
Tel.: + 371 67366924, + 371 67366621, + 371 27880666
www.twitter.com/csb_latvia
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More information on data:
Liene Āboliņa
Income and Living Conditions Statistics Section
E-mail: Liene [dot] Abolina [at] csb [dot] gov [dot] lv
Tel.: + 371 67366727